Nederlandse Modelbouw en Luchtvaartsite

Dutch Modelling and Aviation

ADs by Google

In Memoriam

Klaas Willem Jonker
(Wilko)
† April 30, 2018

On Monday 30 April 2018, Wilko Jonker died after a long illness at the age of 58. He leaves behind a wife and two children. The Dutch military aviation and plastic modeling were his hobby and on this website he shared all the knowledge he has collected over the years. His hobby has been able to distract him from the persistent disease in his body until the last week of his life. The contacts with other hobbyists were a major support for him.

This website will be maintained by different people for as long as possible, so that other enthusiasts can continue to benefit from extensive content.

Visitors

7.png2.png5.png1.png2.png7.png
Today180
Yesterday387
This week2066
This month8825
Total725127

Visitor Info

  • IP: 35.175.120.174

Friday, 22 November 2019 12:01

Sopwith 1½ Strutter

History

The Sopwith 1½ Strutter finds its origin from a Sopwith design from December 1914. This was a small two-seat biplane with a 80 hp Gnome rotary engine. This aircraft was known as "Sigrist Bus"

The Sigrist Bus formed the base for a new larger aircraft, the Sopwith LCT (Land Clerget Tractor) with a 110 hp LeClerget. As with the Sigrist Bus both upper wing-halves were connected to the fuselage by a couple of smaller and larger struts, which together formed a W. The nickname soon became 1½ Strutter.

The first prototype made its maiden flight in January 1916.

The pilot and the observer sat in a separated tandem.

The observer had a movable gun available and the pilot had a fixed synchronized Vickers machine-gun. Initially the type of synchronization system varied and had some teething problems.

The aircraft could carry a bomb-load of four 10 kg bombs under the wings.

Versions.

The French aircraft was the largest customer of the Sopwith 1½ Strutter. It was ordered to succeed the Farman.

The Sopwith 1½ Strutter was built in France in three versions:

Sopwith 1.A2 1½ Strutter:
a two seat scout;
Sopwith 1.B2 1½ Strutter:
a two seat bomber;
Sopwith 1.B1 1½ Strutter:
a single seat bomber.

Also in Russia the Sopwith 1½ Strutter was built under license by Duks and Lebedev in a quantity of 100 examples. Also large amount s were delivered to Russia by Britain and France.

In Britain about 1500 examples were built for the RFC and RNAS and in France between 4200 and 4500 examples were built.

Variants

Sopwith Type 9400:
official Navy designation for two seat version.
Sopwith Type 9700:
naval designation for single seat bomber.
Sopwith Two-seater:
Official RFC designation.
Sopwith 1½ Strutter:
unofficial name for two seat reconnaissance version and bomber.
Sopwith Comic:
Single seat air defence fighter for home front.
Ship Strutter:
carrier version.
SOP. 1:
French version.
LeO 1:
Lioré et Olivier license version.
So-shiki Model 1:
Japanese license of bomber version.
So-Shiki Model 2:
Japanese license of reconnaissance version.

 

Technical information Sopwith-Hanriot 1.B1 1½ Strutter
Dimensions:
Length: 7,7 m Wingspan: 10,21 m
Height: 3,12 m Wing area: 32,14 m2
Weights:
Empty weight: 570 kg Max. start weight: 975 kg
Performances:
Max. speed: 164 km/hr Rate of climb: - m/min
Range: 565 km Service ceiling: 3960 m
Miscellaneous:
Engine type: One le Clerget 9B rated 130 hp
Crew: One aviator
Armament: One fixed forward firing .303 inch Vickers machine gun

 

Technical information Sopwith 1½ Strutter
Dimensions:
Length: 7,7 m Wingspan: 10,21 m
Height: 3,12 m Wing area: 32,14 m2
Weights:
Empty weight: 592 kg Max. start weight: 975 kg
Performances:
Max. speed: 164 km/hr Rate of climb: - m/min
Range: 565 km Service ceiling: 3960 m
Miscellaneous:
Engine type: One le Clerget 9B rated 130 hp
Crew: Two men: one aviator plus one observer/air gunner
Armament: One or two fixed forward firing .303 inch Vickers machine gun(s);
60 kg bombs