Nederlandse Modelbouw en Luchtvaartsite

Dutch Modelling and Aviation

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In Memoriam

Klaas Willem Jonker
(Wilko)
† April 30, 2018

On Monday 30 April 2018, Wilko Jonker died after a long illness at the age of 58. He leaves behind a wife and two children. The Dutch military aviation and plastic modeling were his hobby and on this website he shared all the knowledge he has collected over the years. His hobby has been able to distract him from the persistent disease in his body until the last week of his life. The contacts with other hobbyists were a major support for him.

This website will be maintained by different people for as long as possible, so that other enthusiasts can continue to benefit from extensive content.

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History

Development.

The design of the Hawker Hunter was a project of the design team of Sir Sydney Camm. The aircraft, P.1067 was meant to test the new Rolls Royce (R.A.5 rated 2.950 kg thrust) A.J.65 jet engine, later known as Rolls Royce Avon.
The newest developments were used, such as swept wing.
In 1951 the first production version flew, designated Hawker Hunter Mk.1
The aircraft had supported steering of the rudders and proofed to be a manoeuvrable airplane.
Also armament of four 30 mm Aden guns was used, radar was used to determine the distance to the target. The guns were mounted in a gun pack, which could be lowered by using a lift. Also a single fuel supply was available, so the Hunter could be quickly serviced.
A limitation of many jet fighter at that time was the limited range, which made the use of external fuel tanks necessary. A total of 1969 examples were built, some users for instance the Swiss air force used the Hunter till the eighties.

Versions.

Hunter F.Mk.1
This was the first production version of the Hunter and entered quickened service. In fact there were still problems with the engine, Rolls Royce Avon 100 and the firing of the guns.
The first examples lacked the breaks under the fuselage. While production continued, several modifications were added. The problem with the shells was solved by extending the exhaust tubes. The problems with the shock waves caused by the firing of the guns was solved with the use of so called ”Blast Deflectors”. The flattened tubes deflected the gasses from the guns in such a way they didn't harm the engine. Another problem was the very limited range of 45 minutes.
Hunter F.Mk.2:
This version was identical to the Mk.1, built at Armstrong-Whitworth and equipped with a Armstrong-Siddeley Sapphire engine. This engine was built under license in the US as J.65 in the VS and used in the Republic F-84. This engine proofed to be better than the Rolls Royce Avon, but Hawker preferred Rolls Royce engines though.
Hunter F.3:
This was a modified prototype to be used for the speed record.
Hunter F.Mk.4:
In fact this type was a re-engined Mk.1 equipped with the Rolls Royce Avon Mk. 120 rated 3.630 kg thrust.
Also the internal fuel capacity was extended from 1.276 to 1.568 liter. Also the wing was reinforced and modified so pylons could be used to carry additional external fuel tanks (378 liter each) or bombs.
Later the wing was modified with modification 228, the saw tooth, to solve the pitching problem. This modification was also done on the existing operational aircraft. Export versions were the Mk.50, 51 and 52.
Hunter F.Mk.5:
This model was identical to the Mk.4, but equipped with a Armstrong-Siddely Sapphire engine.Hunter F.Mk.6:
This model was developed via the Hawker P.1083 and its derivative the Hawker P.1099. It was equipped with the stronger Rolls Royce Avon 200 rated 4.536 kg thrust, the saw tooth and improved steering. Also extra pylons could be added. March 1955 the first F.Mk. 6 was delivered to the RAF. A subversion was the F.6A, which was equipped with a brake chute, like the FGA.9. Export versions were the Mk.56, Mk.58 and Mk.60.
Hunter T.Mk.7:
In 1954 Hawker received specifications for a trainer version of the Hunter. The prototype made its maiden flight in June 1955. Initially there were some problems regarding the shape of the canopy
In February 1956 these problems were solved, also was decided to equip the aircraft with a brake chute; also the problems occurred with the engine, but the production version was equipped with a other engine. In October 1957 the first production aircraft made its maiden flight.
The RAF received 54 new aircraft plus six converted Hunter Mk.4s.
Danmark received six aircraft under the designation T.53, which lacked the wing modification; Peru received one trainer as T 62, which had a compass radome on the fuselage, just aft the canopy. India received 26 T.66’s and late another five T.66E’s, equipped with an Avon 203 engine. Many other countries, also the Netherlands, bought the Hunter trainer.
Hunter T.Mk.8:
This was a version of the T.MK.7 especially for the Royal Navy and equipped with an arrestor hook under the fuselage. Ten T.Mk.7’s were modified during production, later an additional seventeen and ten converted Mk.4' were delivered.
Hunter FGA.9:
At the end of the fifties the DeHavilland Venom needed to be replaced. Decided was to modify the Hunter for ground attacks. The wings were reinforced, pylons were modified, so 870 litre fuel tanks could be carried. because of these larger tanks a modification of the flaps was necessary. The outward pylon could be dropped and also a brake chute was added. Internal air conditioning was added, for use in tropical situations. Export versions were FGA.59; FGA70; FGA71; FGA73.
Hunter GA.11:
This was a modified version for training purposes for the Fleet Air Arm. The aircraft were modified Mk.4’s, with modification 228; arrestor hook. The guns were removed. Forty examples of this model were delivered.

 

Technical information Hunter F.Mk.4
Dimensions:
Length: 14 m Wing span: 10,26 m
Height: 4 m Wing area: 32,42 m2
Weights:
Empty Weight: 6405 kg Max start Weight: 11158 kg
Performance:
Max. speed: 1150 km/u Cruising speed: - km/u
Climbing speed: - m/min    
Service ceiling: 15240 m Range: 3060 km
Miscellaneous:
Crew: One aviator
Engine type: One Rolls Royce Avon Mk 115 rated 40 kN
Armament: Four Aden 30 mm guns

 

Technical information Hunter F.Mk.6
Dimensions:
Length: 14 m Wing span: 10,26 m
Height: 4,01 m Wing area: 32,42 m2
Weights:
Empty Weight: 6405 kg Max start Weight: 11158 kg
Performance:
Max. speed: 1150 km/u Cruising speed: - km/u
Climbing speed: - m/min    
Service ceiling: 15240 m Range: 3060 km
Miscellaneous:
Crew: 1
Engine type: One Rolls Royce Avon Mk. 203 rated 44,48 kN
Armament: Four Aden 30 mm guns; 3400 kg bombs.
Later also AIM-9 Sidewinders.

 

Technical information Hunter T.Mk.7
Dimensions:
Length: 14 m Wing span: 10,26 m
Height: 4,01 m Wing area: 32,42 m2
Weights:
Empty Weight: 6405 kg Max start Weight: 11158 kg
       
Performance:
Max. speed: 1150 km/u Cruising speed: - km/u
Climbing speed: - m/min    
Service ceiling: 15240 m Range: 3060 km
Miscellaneous:
Crew: 2
Engine type: One Rolls Royce Avon Mk. 203 rated 44,48 kN
Armament: